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Essay: Booker T. Washington – Up from Slavery

Masterplots II: African American Literature Up from Slavery Analysis

❶She hoped it would help him to learn to read. The narrative begins with Booker T.

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Although no one particular form of Christianity was forced upon the students, it was part of their education to participate in daily services. By doing this Washington felt he was teaching students to be complete persons, who could be proud of themselves and what they were able to accomplish.

Twenty years after its humble beginnings, the Tuskegee Institute encompassed over 2, hundred acres of land, 66 buildings built by the student themselves, and over thirty industrial departments. All of the industrial departments taught trades that allowed students to get jobs as soon as they left the institute.

They were receiving more than twice what they could provide. Because of space and funds, the school could only admit half the men and women who applied. Washington sums up his ideas on education in his autobiography: In our industrial teachings we keep three things in mind: Washington died in as one of the most well known black men in the world.

He sat for dinners with the President of the United States, royalty of Europe, as well as most of the industrial giants of his time. Washington was an intelligent man trying to do what he believed to be best for his people. That was to provide them with an education that would enable them to live exemplary lives.

Although the school was created to help the most black people possible to learn a trade, it now helps a very few earn elite college degrees. Whether it is better to try and help the top10 percent of a population or to help the other 90 percent is a question that has yet to be answered by anyone adequately. Washington felt that if black people were to show white people that they could act civilized and be an asset to the community all the races would eventually get along.

Washington did not think that the government could force one people to accept another with the stroke of a pen. Washington felt that it was up to African Americans to prove themselves as equals. High schools are trying to prepare everyone to go to college rather then teach them how to do a job and earn a living. However, in my opinion, the transformation is too little and too slow for the generation of African Americans that are now being left behind.

I believe that he has been misinterpreted as a separatist. I believe that there should be laws against discrimination. However I also realize, as did Washington, that the government can not force people to change their attitudes. While reading about Washington I came across some information that might help vindicate him on his views on education.

Today, the emphasis is on a college degree in academia, instead of manual labor. He reports that a recent survey showed that 25 percent of small businesses surveyed are worried about the shirking number of qualified workers in the trades.

On the other hand in a recent survey of graduates from a small vocational school where of grads responded, only 8 of them were unemployed. The rest were working in their trades. An employment manager for a large electric company states that it is very frustrating that even C- minus students are going to college, leaving only D students for the blue collar jobs. Some African Americans leaders are suggest a return to the ways of Booker T.

But that outcome came years into litigation by the U. And today black students still test two grade level below white schoolmates. I realize that these last few paragraphs are getting off of the autobiography of Booker Washington.

However these questions came to mind while reading the book and you can not help but want to investigate further into the life and legacy of Washington. Life skills such as how to keep a bankbook and save money, bathing, table manners, clothes washing, and mending were also taught. Furthermore Washington made religion a large part of his students program.

Although no one particular form of Christianity was forced upon the students, it was part of their education to participate in daily services. By doing this Washington felt he was teaching students to be complete persons, who could be proud of themselves and what they were able to accomplish.

Twenty years after its humble beginnings, the Tuskegee Institute encompassed over 2, hundred acres of land, 66 buildings built by the student themselves, and over thirty industrial departments. All of the industrial departments taught trades that allowed students to get jobs as soon as they left the institute.

At this point of the institute's life, the major problems were trying to fill the requests for workers. They were receiving more than twice what they could provide. Because of space and funds, the school could only admit half the men and women who applied.

Washington sums up his ideas on education in his autobiography: In our industrial teachings we keep three things in mind: Washington died in as one of the most well known black men in the world.

He sat for dinners with the President of the United States, royalty of Europe, as well as most of the industrial giants of his time. Washington was an intelligent man trying to do what he believed to be best for his people. That was to provide them with an education that would enable them to live exemplary lives.

Some black leaders in America today, such as Alan Keys, look to return to Washington's form of educating the "head, hand, and the heart. Although the school was created to help the most black people possible to learn a trade, it now helps a very few earn elite college degrees. Whether it is better to try and help the top10 percent of a population or to help the other 90 percent is a question that has yet to be answered by anyone adequately.

Washington's view on integration consisted of living by example. Washington felt that if black people were to show white people that they could act civilized and be an asset to the community all the races would eventually get along. Washington did not think that the government could force one people to accept another with the stroke of a pen. Washington felt that it was up to African Americans to prove themselves as equals.

In my opinion, Washington's ideas on education should replace today's school system. High schools are trying to prepare everyone to go to college rather then teach them how to do a job and earn a living. Today's schools are starting to change with Community Based School Management and Charter schools, which return control back to the local level. However, in my opinion, the transformation is too little and too slow for the generation of African Americans that are now being left behind.

I also agree with Washington's views on integration. I believe that he has been misinterpreted as a separatist. I believe that there should be laws against discrimination. However I also realize, as did Washington, that the government can not force people to change their attitudes.

While reading about Washington I came across some information that might help vindicate him on his views on education.

Today, the emphasis is on a college degree in academia, instead of manual labor. Also moral character is definitely not part of today's teachings. Washington" that market trends have shown Washington's system may provide more jobs to a greater number of the population then centers for higher learning.

He reports that a recent survey showed that 25 percent of small businesses surveyed are worried about the shirking number of qualified workers in the trades. On the other hand in a recent survey of graduates from a small vocational school where of grads responded, only 8 of them were unemployed.

The rest were working in their trades. According to Michael Cantwell, national director of manufacturing at a management consulting firm, "There is clearly a supply and demand problem for many manufactures" Maxwell. An employment manager for a large electric company states that it is very frustrating that even C- minus students are going to college, leaving only D students for the blue collar jobs.

Since the Civil Rights movement of the 's, and forced busing starting in , living standards for African Americans in America have declined markedly Martin. Some African Americans leaders are suggest a return to the ways of Booker T.

But that outcome came years into litigation by the U. And today black students still test two grade level below white schoolmates. Alvin Thornton, who devised the Neighbor Schools Plan, believes we should teach the whole child as did Washington, "It's about making the black child whole-even if it means educating them in schools that happen to be all black Eddings.

How does Booker's philosophy on education evolve over time? In what ways do his ideas remain unchanged? Describe the various jobs Booker has as a child, first as a slave on a plantation and later as a free person in his stepfather's town. View all Lesson Plans available from BookRags. Copyrights Up from Slavery from BookRags. Get Up from Slavery from Amazon. View the Study Pack. Order our Up from Slavery Lesson Plans. Short Essay Questions Key. Short Answer Questions Key.

Oral Reading Evaluation Sheet. One Week Quiz A.


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The autobiography of Booker T. Washing titled Up From Slavery is a rich narrative of the man’s life from slavery to one of the founders of the Tuskegee Institute. The book takes us through one of the most dynamic periods in this country’s history, especially African Americans.

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Up From Slavery study guide contains a biography of Booker T. Washington, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

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The book "Up from Slavery", is about a nine-year-old slave named Booker T. Washington who lived on a plantation in Virginia. Booker T. Washington describes his childhood as a slave as well as the hard work it took to get an education. Suggested essay topics and project ideas for Up from Slavery. Part of a detailed Lesson Plan by daramad.cf